Media BiasNSA Surveillance Leak CasePolitics

NSA Surveillance Watch: AP Poll- Most Say U.S. Needs Warrant to Snoop?

The ASSociated Press: Poll: Most Say U.S. Needs Warrant to Snoop

A majority of Americans want the Bush administration to get court approval before eavesdropping on people inside the United States, even if those calls might involve suspected terrorists, an AP-Ipsos poll shows.

Over the past three weeks, President Bush and top aides have defended the electronic monitoring program they secretly launched shortly after Sept. 11, 2001, as a vital tool to protect the nation from al-Qaida and its affiliates.

Yet 56 percent of respondents in an AP-Ipsos poll said the government should be required to first get a court warrant to eavesdrop on the overseas calls and e-mails of U.S. citizens when those communications are believed to be tied to terrorism.

Flap reads the poll differently than KATHERINE SHRADER, Associated Press Writer.

Look at the poll graphic above.

Does the poll NOT ask the question:

Should the Bush Administration be required to get a warrant before monitoring communications between Americans in the United States and suspected terrorists?

Look at the Rasmussen Poll taken December 26-27 and whose question more accurately reflects the NSA Surveillance progam.

The Rasmussen question:

Should the National Security Agency be allowed to intercept telephone conversations between terrorism suspects in other countries and people living in the United States?

The RESULTS of the Rasmussen Poll:

Survey of 1,000 Adults

December 26-27, 2005

Should the National Security Agency be allowed to intercept telephone conversations between terrorism suspects in other countries and people living in the United States?

Yes 64%
No 23%

Is President Bush the first President to authorize a program for intercepting telephone conversations between terrorism suspects in other countries and people living in the United States?

Yes 26%
No 48%

Sixty-four percent (64%) of Americans believe the National Security Agency (NSA) should be allowed to intercept telephone conversations between terrorism suspects in other countries and people living in the United States. A Rasmussen Reports survey found that just 23% disagree.

Sixty-eight percent (68%) of Americans say they are following the NSA story somewhat or very closely.

Just 26% believe President Bush is the first to authorize a program like the one currently in the news. Forty-eight percent (48%) say he is not while 26% are not sure.

Eighty-one percent (81%) of Republicans believe the NSA should be allowed to listen in on conversations between terror suspects and people living in the United States. That view is shared by 51% of Democrats and 57% of those not affiliated with either major political party.

Survey of 1,000 Adults

December 26-27, 2005

Should the National Security Agency be allowed to intercept telephone conversations between terrorism suspects in other countries and people living in the United States?

Yes 64%
No 23%

RasmussenReports.com


Is President Bush the first President to authorize a program for intercepting telephone conversations between terrorism suspects in other countries and people living in the United States?

Yes 26%
No 48%

RasmussenReports.com


Did the ASSociated Press come/jump to the wrong conclusion or was the AP conclusion simply validated by a faulty or poorly worded poll question.

Or was this simply MSM BIAS?

The NSA Surveillance program whose details of which remain classified involved the intercepts between suspected foreign terrorists outside the United States to people within the United States.

This was NOT merely a DOMESTIC or within the United States warrantless surveillance program. But, a limited program for communications originating outside the United States.

President Bush: “The NSA program is one that listens to a few numbers called from the outside of the United States of known al-Qaida or affiliated people.”

The ASSociated Press does NOT make this distinction or publish the facts.

Media Bias?

You betcha……..

Previous:

NSA Surveillance Leak Case Watch: Vice President Cheney Strongly Defends Eavesdropping Operation

Cox & Forkum: One Man’s Whistleblower

Global War on Terror Watch: Why the NSA Monitors Communications of Al-Qaida


NSA Surveillance Leak Case Watch: President Bush Defends NSA Surveillance

NSA Leak Case Watch: New York Times’ Reporter James Risen


NSA Leak Case Watch: Justice Deptartment Probing Domestic Spying Leak

NSA Surveillance Watch: President Had Legal Authority to OK Taps

NSA Surveillance Watch: Carter and Clinton Executive Orders Authorizing Secret Searches Without a Warrant


NSA Surveillance Watch: Calls for Congressional Hearings

NSA Surveillance Watch: President Bush defends Spying as “A Necessary Part of My Job to Protect” Americans from Attack


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