Elliot SpitzerHillary ClintonMichael Ramirez

The Hypocrisy of Elliot Spitzer

Michael Ramirez parodies Elliot Spitzer in backing away from his support for driver’s licenses for illegal aliens

New York Governor Elliot Spitzer is in big trouble and it wasn’t the SEX but money transfers that tipped off the feds.

Spitzer was leading a double life and he should resign immediately. His reckless, self-involved behavior is inexcusable and his public career is over. In fact, Spitzer may face legal jeopardy.

As recently as this past Valentine’s Day, Feb. 13, Spitzer, who officials say is identified in a federal complaint as “Client 9,” arranged for a prostitute “Kristen” to meet him in Washington, D.C.

The woman met Client 9 at the Mayflower Hotel, room 871, “for her tryst,” according to the complaint. Client 9 also is alleged to have paid for the woman’s train tickets, cab fare, mini bar and room service, travel time and hotel.

Spitzer, who made his name by bringing high-profile cases against many of New York’s financial giants, is likely to be prosecuted under a relatively obscure statute called “structuring,” according to a Justice Department official.

Structuring involves creating a series of financial movements designed to obscure the true purpose of the payments.

Prosecutors reportedly have a series of e-mails and wiretapped phone conversations of Spitzer.

In a interview two years ago, Spitzer, then-attorney general, told ABC News he had some advice for people who break the law. “Never talk when you can nod, and never nod when you can wink, and never write an e-mail because it’s death. You’re giving prosecutors all the evidence we need,” he said.

Spitzer’s career began with fighting organized crime and then prosecuting white collar criminals. This entire mess REEKS of HYPOCRISY. And, having his wife stand up there with him at the news conference – Good God!

Flap doubts Spitzer will remain in office past noon tomorrow.

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New York Governor Elliot Spitzer to Resign Tonight Due to Prostitution Scandal?


11 thoughts on “The Hypocrisy of Elliot Spitzer

  1. Do you apply this standard to Republicans caught with hookers also?

    I don’t think he will make it through this mess.

  2. What standard?

    Do you apply YOUR standard to Gay lovers while married to a woman.

    How about Larry Craig? Mark Foley? David Vitter?

    You tell me which is worse? And, who will be prosecuted criminally.

  3. Pingback: Neocon News
  4. How about applying this standard to all politicians caught with hookers? Do you support that standard?

    1. Too vague and ambiguous a standard.

      What about an affair? What about sex outside of marriage? Gay sex vs straight sex?

      While in office or before being elected?

      Be specific.

  5. NY is justifiably benefited by the exposure of the hypocrisy of Gov. Spitzer in his personal vs his public dealings.

    But the fact that it was through money transfers and not through the more visible conduct of prostitution (which was never the target of the investigation) that is allowed to prevail in NY is disturbing.

    The choice of money laundering enforcement over prostitution enforcement definitely illustrates a problem with the credibility of the entire justice system where one is made a target, and the other dissmissed as unimportant.

    As a byproduct of the money laundering enforcement, the prostitution charges came about but as a byproduct, it reveals the flaws in a system based upon hypocrisy that cannot be overlooked – as the proper administration of law. How many money laundering charges could be found in targeting prostitution or trafficking? Who knows? No one bothers, apparently. But should they?

    The opportunity to ignore some laws and pursue others may yield a measure of social justice in the end, but can only do so by accident – exactly the circumstances of the Spitzer arrest, and resignation.

    Law enforcement by accident, or judicial administration by accident, is not the kind of legal or social justice intended to be practiced in America, and is a violation of its own equal treatment standard of the Constitution that presupposes that justice is for everyone, not simply a few.

    For most, this doesn’t and can’t qualify as public security capble of being reliable or predictable, and is unworthy of tax support.

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