Day By Day

Day By Day June 28, 2012 – Profiles in Lavage

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Day By Day by Chris Muir

Today’s Day By Day cartoon highlights Massachusetts Democrat U.S. Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren and her claim of American Indian heritage.

More symbolism over substance from the LEFT.

Democrat Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren says she listed herself as Cherokee to get invited to tribal “luncheons.” So, why did she turn down a powwow with her alleged kin?

Warren, a Harvard law professor, is trying to take back Ted Kennedy’s old Massachusetts seat held by GOP Sen. Scott Brown.

When the Boston Herald learned the blue-eyed blonde had listed herself in faculty recruiting directories as an American Indian, Warren denied trying to get an affirmative action leg up. She insisted she ID’d herself as a minority for social reasons.

“I listed myself in the directory in the hopes it might mean I would be invited to a luncheon with people who are like I am,” Warren explained.

Well, some Cherokee women have called her bluff. Four authentic Indians traveled to Boston from Oklahoma, Oregon and Missouri to arrange a lunch with Warren — and she snubbed them.

They were in town four days, yet Warren couldn’t find time to fit them into her schedule. Even her staff blew them off. Her campaign never even returned their calls, despite an earlier promise that at least some staffers would meet with them.

The advantage swings to Republican Senator Scott Brown.

Does Warren have any thoughts on baseball?

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Scott Brown

MA-Sen Poll Watch: Scott Brown 45% Vs. Joseph Kennedy 40%

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According to the latest Suffolk Poll.

Favorable Vs. Unfavorable:

  • Deval Patrick: 52 / 36
  • Scott Brown: 58 / 22
  • Setti Warren: 5 / 4
  • Tim Murray: 31 / 16
  • Ed Markey: 37 / 19
  • Joe Kennedy: 58 / 26
  • Mike Capuano: 29 / 16
  • Barack Obama: 57 / 35
  • Hillary Clinton: 74 / 19
  • Vicki Kennedy: 42 / 22

Note: Senator Scott Brown fairs better than President Obama.

Head to Head:

  • 52% Brown (R), 37% Patrick (D)
  • 52% Brown (R), 26% Capuano (D)
  • 51% Brown (R), 23% Murray (D)
  • 45% Brown (R), 40% Joe Kennedy (D)
  • 52% Brown (R), 9% Warren (D)
  • 53% Brown (R), 26% Markey (R)
  • 52% Brown (R), 30% Vicki Kennedy (D)

Republican Senator Scott Brown is popular, has plenty of campaign cash and looks at this point an almost lock for re-election to a full six year term in very blue Massachusetts.

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Polling

MA-Sen Poll Watch: Sen. Scott Brown Safe for 2012?

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Massachusetts Republican U.S. Senator Scott Brown

Apparently so, according to a DSCC poll.
Massachusetts is a deeply Democratic state, one in which barely more than 15 percent of the seats in the state Legislature are held by Republicans and fewer than 15 percent of all registered voters belong to the GOP. So it’s hardly surprising that national Democrats have been making noise about defeating the state’s Republican senator, Scott Brown, when he stands for reelection next year.

“It’s a priority for us,” Guy Cecil, the executive director of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, told the Boston Globe when he made a two-day trip to the Bay State earlier this month.

But the DSCC received some bad news this week when a poll it commissioned found that Brown’s popularity is soaring. The survey, which has been seen by at least one D.C. insider and was detailed for Salon, measured Brown’s approval rating at 73 percent — easily surpassing the scores for Barack Obama and the state’s two top Democrats,  Gov. Deval Patrick and Sen. John Kerry. It also found him running over the magic 50 percent mark against every potential Democratic challenger, and crushing the strongest perceived Democrats (Reps. Michael Capuano and Ed Markey and former Rep. Marty Meehan) by double-digit margins. The results only grew closer when respondents were primed with negative information about Brown.

Good news for the GOP in taking over the U.S. Senate majority in 2012. The Republicans need to win a net of three seats to replace Harry Reid as Senate Majority Leader.

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